Type1Screen receives DARP funding

Type1Screen receives Diabetes Australia Research (DARP) funding

We’re grateful to Diabetes Australia for a generous grant to help us bring the home testing risk screening kits over the finish line and out to families.

A. Prof John Wentworth was interviewed recently by former professional Australian rules footballer, Jack Fitzpatrick, for the Diabetes Victoria podcasts. Jack lives with type 1 diabetes himself.

The interview discussed the advancement of risk screening for type 1 diabetes and the aim to identify people in the earliest stages of the condition as possible to:

1. offer current and emerging immunotherapy trials and treatments, and

2. avoid severe illness and hospitalisation

Hear the full interview here: https://www.diabetesvic.org.au/podcasts 

Finger prick test for Type1Screen

Finger prick test for Type1Screen

… launching in 2022!

Type1Screen is working hard to accurately identify if the early markers of type 1 diabetes are present (or not) from a finger prick blood spot sample.

Many Type1Screen participants have provided both finger prick test (capillary blood) and needle in the arm (venous blood) samples. Thank you all soooooo much! These samples are helping us to validate a new test or “assay” to accurately determine someone’s risk of type 1 diabetes.

We are still in the process of validating the finger prick assay. This means that we are testing to make sure that the assay reliably finds early markers of type 1 diabetes (islet auto-antibodies – IAs) if there are any IAs in the blood. Equally, we want to make sure that the test does not find IAs when there are no antibodies present in the blood.

The finger prick assay is more complex than the regular assay that uses a venous blood sample. A spot of blood is put on a card, but the sample tends to degrade (breakdown) a little in the post. This makes it more difficult to extract any antibodies from the sample to do the test.

Our recent results comparing both methods tell us that might will miss some children who actually do have islet autoantibodies using the blood spot sample method. We are working hard to make the assay more reliable.

The aim is to be ready to launch the new do-it-yourself in the home assay in 2022. Stay tuned!

Help us help others at risk of T1D

Support Type1Screen

Help us help others at risk of type 1 diabetes.

Type1Screen’s ultimate goal is to develop cheap and accurate screening for every Australian child to ensure early diagnosis, prevent hospitalisation and develop immune therapies that turn type one into type none.

We are currently working up a blood spot assay that can be collected in the home. We missed out on a grant in 2021 to progress this work and must now reach out directly to our supporters to develop this test.

Could you help us keep helping others by making a tax-deductible donation at:

https://royal-melbourne-hospital.giveeasy.org/ScreenPrevent?

You can help us play a critical role in convincing Government that universal type 1 diabetes screening both improves health and decreases health costs.

THANK YOU!

Updated consent forms

Updated Type1Screen consent forms

To those extremely observant people who have noticed a change in our participant information and consent forms (PICFs)… you are extremely observant!!!

It is true that we have uploaded version 3 of our PICFs to the “Home” and “What’s Involved” web pages.

The update was to ensure that participants and their families are prepared for the fact that news of a positive islet autoantibody screen can be very stressful.

The new PICF also includes exciting developments in our antibody assays, which will allow for home finger prick sample collection. This will be up and running in the near future. Stay tuned.

You can also download the PICF for minors aged 2-18 years by clicking on this link, and for adults aged 18-30 at this link.